Design for all

Case Study

Case Study about Usability

 

“He who constructs for youth excludes the old, he who constructs for the old includes the young.”

The current demographic development also plays an increasingly important role in design and was the occasion for the discussion of the problems of the everyday life of older people within the framework of this project. The focus was on the handling of packaging with the aim of enabling a self-determined life into old age.

The result is a range of beverage packaging that facilitates handling and transport through form and function.

 

The challenge:

The basic target group of the research were older people (65+). The first tests showed how extensive the problem of usability of packaging actually is. It concerns very different areas of life, not only the food sector, but also electronic consumer goods, clothing and much more.

In a first step it was therefore successful to limit the research to the core problems in the everyday life of the target group. The most common difficulties were encountered when opening beverage containers, which is why the focus of the rest of the process was on the opening mechanisms.

 

The base

Many older people feel that shopping is not a duty to be fulfilled, but a meaningful and satisfying activity. Communication and social contacts to other people play a particularly important role here.

Shopping is perceived as a leisure activity, as an entertaining activity and means for many people integration and participation in social life.

Consumption is equated with quality of life and, for most older people, means more than just providing daily food. For them it means communication with the environment, leisure activities and active social participation.

There are some points that are important to older consumers when shopping – in addition to high-quality materials, good quality, a good price-performance ratio and long shelf life, the products should function perfectly. The handling therefore plays an important role here.

USER RESEARCH

In many application tests the problems of the target group with the handling of packaging were observed. Among other things, this revealed many different aids – so many that the users themselves were not even aware of what they had in their drawers to help themselves to. In older pairs, the distribution of roles when opening also became quite clear here: Strength (man) and sensitivity (woman).

The tests included a questionnaire.

It was only through extensive research that it was possible to create specific personas and continue working with them.

THE Criteria

After the research, a number of criteria were defined that constitute a user-oriented packaging design.

These included for example

Handling: opening, product removal

Transport: Bundling, carrying devices

Convenience: immediately applicable, simple, instinctive operation

Sturdiness

Size of contents = size of packaging

Reduction to the most important information, in sufficient font size (+10pt)

Content should be accessible from the outside

Aesthetic

According to these criteria, 4 new packages were developed and subsequently tested.

THE Criteria

After the research, a number of criteria were defined that constitute a user-oriented packaging design.

These included for example

Handling: opening, product removal

Transport: Bundling, carrying devices

Convenience: immediately applicable, simple, instinctive operation

Sturdiness

Size of contents = size of packaging

Reduction to the most important information, in sufficient font size (+10pt)

Content should be accessible from the outside

Aesthetic

According to these criteria, 4 new packages were developed and subsequently tested.

THE DESIGN

Creation of prototypes and tests

The results of the research. The subsequent tests with the prototypes were successful and the users were enthusiastic.

Classy

The cup on the closure makes it easy to drink from a glass while on the move and at the same time serves as an opening aid thanks to the enlarged grip area.

Classy

The cup on the closure makes it easy to drink from a glass while on the move and at the same time serves as an opening aid thanks to the enlarged grip area.

The Key

The front door key, for example, finds its place in the recess in the upper quarter of the lock. The key takes over the function of an extended handle with which the lock can be opened without any problems.

The place for objects from daily life offers here an uncomplicated and safe way of opening.

1+1

“1+1” complements each other to an optimal aid that allows the user to use the leverage to open the lock with little force.

1+1

“1+1” complements each other to an optimal aid that allows the user to use the leverage to open the lock with little force.

Carry On

The precisely fitting profiles on the underside of the crate handle and on the top of the closures allow the handle to be used as an aid to the opening mechanism by simply placing it on the crate.

After use, it can again be placed in the beverage crate and used for transport.

Carry On

The precisely fitting profiles on the underside of the crate handle and on the top of the closures allow the handle to be used as an aid to the opening mechanism by simply placing it on the crate.

After use, it can again be placed in the beverage crate and used for transport.

Disciplines

#user centered design #user experience #user research #packaging design

EXCOURSE

In the supermarket for elder people

These supermarkets offer some advantages that make shopping easier, especially for older customers.

For example, some of the shopping trolleys offer seating for resting in between. On the chain hangs a magnifying glass with which too small inscriptions on packaging can be read.

The step in front of the refrigerated shelf makes it easier to reach into one of the top rows. Not only for old people – also for small people. Smaller packaging units contribute to a lower weight on the way home and avoid having to throw away leftovers. Additional, clear information is needed where the customer is left to his own devices.

EXCOURSE

At the supermarket for elder people

These supermarkets offer some advantages that make shopping easier, especially for older customers.

For example, some of the shopping trolleys offer seating for resting in between. On the chain hangs a magnifying glass with which too small inscriptions on packaging can be read.

The step in front of the refrigerated shelf makes it easier to reach into one of the top rows. Not only for old people – also for small people. Smaller packaging units contribute to a lower weight on the way home and avoid having to throw away leftovers. Additional, clear information is needed where the customer is left to his own devices.

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